What's Going Around?

Allergies

Seasonal allergies, or hayfever, are very common at this time of year. Typical symptoms include watery, itchy, red eyes; a clear runny nose; sneezing; and an itchy palate or throat. The most common triggers are trees in the spring, grasses in the summer, and weeds in the fall!

Effective non-sedating medications are now available for children over the age of 2 without a prescription for treatment of seasonal allergies. These include loratadine (generic Claritin), Claritin, and Zyrtec. These medications can be given as needed for allergy symptoms. If you think your child has seasonal allergies and he or she is not responding to medication OR if you are not sure, please make an appointment in our office.

Many children do not require allergy testing if they respond to treatment with medication as needed.

For more information: See also Eye - Allergy


Colds and Upper Respiratory Infections

Colds, upper respiratory infections, and URIs are common terms we use to describe viral illnesses that cause nasal congestion, runny nose, sneezing, sore throat, fever, and cough. The fever usually lasts for 2-3 days, and the cough with congestion and runny nose may last for 5-10 days. The typical preschool-age child may experience 6-10 colds per year. Most colds resolve on their own with rest and fluids, but some may lead to ear infection, sinus infection, asthma attack, or other complications. If you are concerned about the possibility of one of these complications, please have your child seen in our office for an evaluation.

For more information: See also Colds , See also Sinus Pain or Congestion


Enterovirus

We are currently seeing children and adolescents with infections caused by the enteroviruses, a group of viruses that often cause illness during the summer and the early fall months. The commonly used term "enterovirus" includes the coxsackie viruses, the echoviruses, and the enteroviruses. These viruses often cause a fever, and also may cause a rash, respiratory or cold symptoms, and vomiting with diarrhea. Hand-foot-mouth disease, a rash that involves those areas of the body, is a common enteroviral infection that occurs in children. More serious illnesses that are caused by these viruses include meningitis, heart infections, and eye infections. For mild illnesses caused by the enteroviruses, the best treatment is adequate rest, plenty of fluids, and fever control.

NOTE: Enterovirus D68: This fall season, an enterovirus that causes primarily respiratory symptoms has been seen in various regions of the country. Please refer to the Enterovirus D68 article in this What's Going Around? section.


Whooping Cough (Pertussis)

We are currently seeing an increase in cases of Pertussis in our community. Pertussis, or whooping cough, is a respiratory illness that begins with mild cold symptoms and progresses to a severe cough. The cough comes in spasms and is sometimes characterized by a high-pitched whooping sound followed by vomiting. Classic pertussis lasts several weeks with some cases lasting 10 weeks or longer. Pertussis is most severe when it occurs in the first 6 months of life, particularly in those who are unimmunized or who are born prematurely. Older siblings and adults with mild symptoms are an important reservoir of infection for young children and infants. Pertussis is diagnosed clinically and confirmed with laboratory tests.

Treatment

While antibiotics have minimal effect on the course of the illness once the classic whooping cough has begun, they are recommended to limit the spread of the illness. Confirmation of the illness by a medical provider helps guard against the overuse of antibiotics in the setting of a viral illness and subsequent development of organisms that are resistant to antibiotics. Control measures: All household contacts of young infants should receive a pertussis vaccine booster. Others who are unimmunized or under-immunized should complete the recommended schedule of immunizations (see our website for the recommended vaccination schedule). Household contacts and other close contacts of those who have been diagnosed with pertussis should receive prophylactic antibiotic treatment to prevent transmission of the disease. Students and school staff with a confirmed diagnosis of pertussis should be excused from school until they have completed a five day course of antibiotic therapy.

For more information: See also Cough